Three animated films about learning

//Three animated films about learning

Back in December I gave a lecture to the staff of BBC Bitesize about how learning works and how they might go about making more effective learning materials. This talk has been turned into a series of three short animated films by the production company Mosaic. I think they’re pretty good.

Film 1: How learning works: A quick guide to how we store and retrieve information

Film 2: The myth of multitasking and other modern misconceptions about how we learn

Film 3: Cognitive Load Theory: How to make effective learning content

I hope you enjoy them.

NB If you’re outside the UK and can’t view the films, I’m afraid there’s no immediate solution. Here’s a comment from the BBC:

It’s fantastic there’s so much interest, but in terms of making the content available to people from overseas, we’re unable to do this. BBC Learning’s funding stipulates that our content and resources are only made available to UK-based users. This is why our content is geo-locked and, for rights reasons, we wouldn’t be able to grant permission to a third party to make this content available to users from overseas.

For those who want references for the claims in the films, here you go:

Film 1: How learning works: A quick guide to how we store and retrieve information

Olusola Adesope, Dominic Trevisan, & Narayankripa Sundararajan. (2017). Rethinking the use of tests: A meta-analysis of the testing effect. Review of Educational Research, 87, 659 – 701.

Alan Baddeley, “Working Memory: Theories, Models, and Controversies,” Annual Review of Psychology 63 (2012): 1–29.

Elizabeth Bjork and Robert A. Bjork (2003). Intentional Forgetting Can Increase, Not Decrease, Residual Influences of To-Be-Forgotten Information, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 29(4): 524–531.

Elizabeth Bjork & Robert Bjork (2011). Making things hard on yourself, but in a good way: Creating desirable difficulties to enhance learning. In M. A. Gernsbacher, R. W. Pew, L. M. Hough, & J. R. Pomerantz (Eds.), Psychology and the real world: Essays illustrating fundamental contributions to society (pp. 56-64). New York: Worth Publishers.

Robert Bjork & Elizabeth Bjork, (1992). “A new theory of disuse and an old theory of stimulus fluctuation.” In A. F. Healy, S. M. Kosslyn, & R. M. Shiffrin (Eds.), From Learning Processes to Cognitive Processes: Essays in Honor of William K. Estes, (Vol. 2, pp. 35-67). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Nicholas J. Cepeda, Harold Pashler, Edward Vul, John T. Wixted, and Doug Rohrer, “Distributed Practice in Verbal Recall Tasks: A Review and quantitative Synthesis,” Psychological Bulletin 132, no. 3 (2006): 354–380.

Doug Rohrer and Kelli Taylor, “The Shuffling of Mathematics Problems Improves Learning,” Instructional Science 35 (2007): 481–498.

Nicholas C Soderstrom & Robert Bjork (2015). “Learning Versus Performance: An Integrative Review.” Perspectives on psychological science: a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. 10. 176-199. 10.1177/1745691615569000.

Film 2: The myth of multitasking and other modern misconceptions about how we learn

Robert A. Bjork, John Dunlosky, and Nate Kornell, “Self-Regulated Learning: Beliefs, Techniques, and Illusions,” Annual Review of Psychology 64 (2013): 417–444.

John Dunlosky, Katherine A. Rawson, Elizabeth J. Marsh, Mitchell J. Nathan, and Daniel T. Willingham, “Improving Students’ Learning with Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions from Cognitive and Educational Psychology,” Psychological Science in the Public Interest 14, no. 1 (2013): 4–58.

Paul Howard-Jones (2014) “Neuroscience and education: myths and messages”. Nature Reviews Neuroscience doi:10.1038/nrn3817

Kåre Letrud & Sigbjørn Hernes. (2018) “Excavating the origins of the learning pyramid myths.” Cogent Education (2018), 5: 1518638

Harold Pashler, Mark McDaniel, Doug Rohrer & Robert Bjork. (2008). “Learning Styles: Concepts and Evidence.” Psychological Science in the Public Interest. 9. 105- 119. 10.1111/j.1539-6053.2009.01038.x.

Melina Uncapher (2016) “Could you survive using only 10 percent of your brain?” Deans for Impact. Retrieved from https://deansforimpact.org/could-you-surviveusing-only-10-percent-of-your-brain/

Melina Uncapher (2016) “Exploring the Left Brain/Right Brain Myth.” Deans for Impact. Retrieved from https://deansforimpact.org/exploring-the-left-brainrightbrain-myth/

Film 3: Explainers explained: How to make effective learning content

Ruth Colvin Clark, Evidence-Based Training Methods (Alexandria, VA: ATD Press, 2015).

Ruth Colvin Clark, Frank Nguyen and John Sweller, Efficiency in Learning: EvidenceBased Guidelines to Manage Cognitive Load (San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer, 2006).

Chandler, Paul and John Sweller (1992). The Split-Attention Effect as a Factor in the Design of Instruction, British Journal of Educational Psychology 62(2): 233–246.

Paul A. Kirschner, John Sweller and Richard E. Clark, Why Minimal Guidance During Instruction Does Not Work: An Analysis of the Failure of Constructivist, Discovery, Problem-Based, Experiential, and Inquiry-Based Teaching, Educational Psychologist 41(2) (2006): 75–86 at 80.

Richard E. Mayer and Roxana Moreno, Nine Ways to Reduce Cognitive Load in Multimedia Learning, Educational Psychologist 38(1) (2003): 43–52;

Richard E. Mayer, Research-Based Principles for Designing Multimedia Instruction. In Victor A. Benassi, Catherine E. Overson and Christopher M. Hakala (eds), Applying Science of Learning in Education: Infusing Psychological Science into the Curriculum (Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2009), pp. 59–70.

John Sweller, Cognitive Load During Problem Solving: Effects on Learning, Cognitive Science 12(2) (1988): 257–285.

John Sweller, Paul Ayres and Slava Kalyuga (2011). Cognitive Load Theory: Explorations in the Learning Sciences, Instructional Systems and Performance Technologies (New York: Springer).

2019-04-15T15:50:09+00:00April 9th, 2019|Featured|

47 Comments

  1. Idit M April 9, 2019 at 8:42 pm - Reply

    Hi, I am very interested in these videos. However, I live outside of Great Britain, and therefore I could not find them. Could you advise? Thank you very much in advance .

  2. Claire Nailon April 9, 2019 at 9:06 pm - Reply

    I live in Australia so I cannot view the films. Is there another way of viewing them?

    • Monique Ryan April 9, 2019 at 10:49 pm - Reply

      Same, Claire. I have tried a few ways but can’t view either.

  3. Julia April 9, 2019 at 11:56 pm - Reply

    Would love to view in Hong Kong!

  4. Janelle Purcell (@JanellePurcell) April 10, 2019 at 1:05 am - Reply

    Hello
    These videos look invaluable, however, in Australia so not bailable for viewing. Can you help? Thanks

  5. Cal Armstrong (@sig225) April 10, 2019 at 1:32 am - Reply

    Canada signing in to say they’re not available here either 🙁

  6. Dorian Brown April 10, 2019 at 1:32 am - Reply

    Attempting to view from IndonesiaB, to no avail. Be most grateful if you can find a way to make it happen. Many thanks.

  7. Derek Hopper April 10, 2019 at 5:53 am - Reply

    ditto, in NZ and think staff would benefit from seeing these.

  8. Klaudia Schwenk April 10, 2019 at 6:14 am - Reply

    In Germany and working at a British International School …. Would love to watch These!

  9. A.G. Hamill April 10, 2019 at 7:01 am - Reply

    Second Derek’s comment. But my working group is in the U.S.

  10. dumonded April 10, 2019 at 7:26 am - Reply

    I have sent you a message on Twitter to ask for access if possible. Grateful if you can help. Thank you.

  11. Paul Coats April 10, 2019 at 7:26 am - Reply

    Hi David, would love to be able to watch them as well, but am in the Czech Republic.

  12. Dennis April 10, 2019 at 10:05 am - Reply

    I am in the US and I cannot view the videos

  13. Shaun April 10, 2019 at 11:36 am - Reply

    Hi David,
    Like some others who have commented, I’m in Australia and would love to see them. Is there any way to do so?
    Thanks!

  14. Javiera Necochea April 10, 2019 at 12:52 pm - Reply

    Hi. I live in Chile and would love to see them!

  15. Andrew Akhigbe April 10, 2019 at 2:43 pm - Reply

    I live in Nigeria and would like to have the 3 videos. My email address is:
    aaakhigbe@gmail.com.

  16. Jamie April 10, 2019 at 2:45 pm - Reply

    Hi David, I’m in China and would like to share these with staff but I am currently unable to access the films. If you could advise on a way to do so it would be appreciated.

  17. Angie Manzano April 10, 2019 at 3:19 pm - Reply

    I can’t access the videos in the US, please let me know if you can help.

  18. Geoff White... April 10, 2019 at 3:23 pm - Reply

    Would love to watch these in Australia.
    Was in a teaching room today plastered with Growth Mindset quackery – left a link to your site…..

  19. Ryan A April 10, 2019 at 4:31 pm - Reply

    Could you please share with ryan.ahlers@gmail.com
    Thanks

  20. Sara Hjelm April 10, 2019 at 4:43 pm - Reply

    I hope the BBC reconsiders or sells rights rapidly to release them … Of course I would like to link to those in my website.
    Sara
    https://saraslistofedresources.com/

  21. CristinaM. April 10, 2019 at 4:58 pm - Reply

    Hi DD, being in Rome I simply couldn’t watch any of the videos.
    You know my e-mail, thank you.
    On a different note, it’s such a pity that viewing is so restricted (knowing your in-depth take into various topics in education, I am certain they are extremely valuable and teachers outside Britain cannot access them directly…).

  22. librarytrialblogKeith April 10, 2019 at 6:05 pm - Reply

    Cannot see it here in Canada but I would appreciate being able to.

  23. B April 10, 2019 at 6:06 pm - Reply

    Hello would love to view and possibly use for teacher training in Laos.

  24. LGFC April 10, 2019 at 6:15 pm - Reply

    Pls email me videos. thanks.
    gauchos at gauchos.club

  25. Inge Rutten April 10, 2019 at 6:20 pm - Reply

    Ik zou ze graag zien in Nederland. Groeten Inge

  26. Efrat Furst April 10, 2019 at 6:44 pm - Reply

    I would also love to watch the videos, please add me to the list, efrat.furst@gmail.com
    Thank you!

  27. Paul April 11, 2019 at 2:36 am - Reply
  28. Edwina April 11, 2019 at 3:12 am - Reply

    Hi David, I am in Australia. It would be awesome to watch these videos and show them at a faculty mtg for discussion! Thanks!!

  29. Ryan Ahlers April 11, 2019 at 4:15 am - Reply

    Hi David. I am in Cambodia and unable to view the videos. My email address is ryanahlers@jpa.org.kh.

    Thank you.

  30. Toby Powell April 11, 2019 at 8:40 am - Reply

    In New Zealand and would love to see them. tpowell@mags.school.nz

  31. h burke April 11, 2019 at 10:00 am - Reply

    I to would love to access the videos. than-you for all your efforts helping us to reflect and be better informed. hb2011@live.com.au

  32. Derek Hopper April 11, 2019 at 10:56 am - Reply

    You should be able to watch a region restricted video by installing a VPN on your computer. This masks your location but is also a safety feature in that it encrypts the data you send or download, protecting you from hacking (I think). Best one to get is NordVPN which is $3 per month and way better than free versions. Haven’t had time to try it out on David’s vids yet but will over the weekend.

  33. Jennie April 11, 2019 at 11:38 am - Reply

    I would also like to access these films as I live in Australia and can’t get them. Any advice?

    Jennie

  34. David Conroy April 11, 2019 at 8:10 pm - Reply

    I’m conroydave@gmail.com, wood love to see the videos. Cheers

  35. Stephen Sutton April 11, 2019 at 10:30 pm - Reply

    Really enjoyed these – a superb summary of much that I’ve read on the subject. But… At the end of the third video, it talks about supporting crucial narration with text on the screen. Couldn’t this lead to phonological overload? As opposed to dual coding – I’m sure I’ve read about this at some point in an article in Impact. Clarification would be great, many thanks!

    • David Didau April 15, 2019 at 3:54 pm - Reply

      If you were to remember the entirety of the narration as text, then yes. Using text to anchor key pieces of information is an effective way to get viewers to remember more.

  36. Kelly Stephens April 11, 2019 at 11:36 pm - Reply

    Very interested if you find an Australian solution.

  37. Hans April 13, 2019 at 2:31 am - Reply

    Hi Hans here. My email address is Hans dot van dot hutten at xtra dot co dot nz. Would love to see the videos.

  38. Newsround – John Dabell April 13, 2019 at 8:00 am - Reply

    […] How does learning work? See this brilliant series of three short animated films from David Didau. […]

  39. […] Three animated films about learning […]

  40. Andrew Watson April 13, 2019 at 10:52 pm - Reply

    I’d also like a connection to the vids, if possible

  41. David Didau April 15, 2019 at 3:51 pm - Reply

    To all those readers from outside the UK who have asked to view the films, here’s a short comment from the BBC:

    “It’s fantastic there’s so much interest, but in terms of making the content available to people from overseas, we’re unable to do this. BBC Learning’s funding stipulates that our content and resources are only made available to UK-based users. This is why our content is geo-locked and, for rights reasons, we wouldn’t be able to grant permission to a third party to make this content available to users from overseas.”

  42. Paul Kirschner April 15, 2019 at 8:13 pm - Reply

    Try VPN and give your country as the UK. Works like a CHARM

  43. Paul Kirschner April 15, 2019 at 8:16 pm - Reply

    Really nice. Pity thT the BBC used pieces directly from my own p,resentations (multitasking vs.task switching) and those of colleagues almost literally but doesn’t acknowledge it. I would have expected better from them.

    • David Didau April 19, 2019 at 9:59 pm - Reply

      Hi Paul – I’m sorry you think your work hasn’t been acknowledged – have you seen that there is an attached text doc which cites all the references, including to your work?

Constructive feedback is always appreciated

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.