Blog

Home/Blog
Blog2019-05-09T08:57:13+01:00

#ProjectParadise: A group reading project

Well. A few days ago I ran a poll on Twitter to find the most popular long poem for a group reading project and the clear winner, with 44% of the vote, was John Milton's seventeenth century epic, Paradise Lost. OK. If you were to take part in a group reading of a long poem (like the celebs are doing with Rime of the Ancient Mariner' which of the four [...]

By |April 20th, 2020|Categories: Featured|Tags: , |1 Comment

Homework in the time of Corona

It was inevitable: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of uncompleted homework. Gabriel Garcia Marquez I've never been much of fan of homework, not as a child, not as a teacher and nor as a parent. It's always seemed a quite unnecessary imposition. As a child, the 'dog' got to homework with unconvincing regularity. As a teacher I hated having even more marking to do. [...]

By |April 3rd, 2020|Categories: Featured|8 Comments

Exam season and COVID19: What should we do?

In the current climate, worrying about whether this year's GCSE and A level exams are going to go ahead as scheduled may seem like small beans but it's a big deal to those directly affected. My eldest is due to sit her GCSEs and is, understandably, frustrated with the uncertainty. The likelihood that schools will carry on as normal over the exam period is looking more and more remote. Something [...]

By |March 16th, 2020|Categories: Featured|3 Comments

The dangers of hierarchy: a recommendation for improving Ofsted inspections

One of the many hard lessons learned by the aviation industry is that distributing responsibility and challenging hierarchical authority saves lives. From examining flight recorders and listening to cockpit recordings, crash investigators know that otherwise avoidable accidents have been caused by dysfunctional relationships between airline crew. The traditional model was the captain was in absolute authority and that questioning his actions was unthinkable. This led copilots and cabin crew to [...]

By |March 7th, 2020|Categories: Featured|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Why interview feedback is a waste of time

A few years ago I wrote a series of posts on the subject of improving the interview process in schools: Part 1: A brief review of the evidence Part 2: Intuition vs. statistical prediction (in which I made suggestions for improving structured interviews) Part 3: The interview lesson I thought I'd said all I needed to say of the subject of school interviews. Then a few days ago I responded [...]

By |February 27th, 2020|Categories: leadership|Tags: , |3 Comments

What I learned from visiting schools in Uganda

Some months ago I was asked to be part of an advisory panel on a project to improve primary education in Uganda. To say I was surprised would be an understatement. What, I wondered, would I have to offer? The project, SESIL (Strengthening Education Systems for Improved Leadership) is funded by the Department for International Development and managed by Cambridge Education. The basic premise is that by introducing systems for [...]

By |February 26th, 2020|Categories: Featured|Tags: , |0 Comments

Can observation pro formas be used well?

Should observers waltz into lessons armed with a clipboard full of hoops they hope to see teachers jump through? No, probably not. Some years ago I wrote about my preference for how lessons should be observed: The point of a lesson observation should not be to see whether a teacher is slavishly following a checklist, rather it should be to tease out how effectively they are teaching the students in [...]

By |February 9th, 2020|Categories: leadership|2 Comments

This is what I do

For the past seven years I've been working as a freelance training provider and consultant. Most of the work I get comes either from word-of-mouth recommendations, or because someone has seen me speak or read something I've written. The majority of the work I do is in English schools - both primary and secondary (although I also seem to get a fair bit of work in Sweden and the Netherlands) [...]

By |January 31st, 2020|Categories: Featured|0 Comments

Are things so good that normal seems bad?

Former Irish president Mary Robinson has been doing the rounds warning the world it needs to wake up as the hands of the Doomsday Clock are moved to 100 seconds to midnight. Apparently things are so bleak that the world is closer catastrophe than at any point in history. Not only is climate change about to wash away most of the world's coastline, but the threat of nuclear annihilation is [...]

By |January 24th, 2020|Categories: Featured|Tags: , , , |11 Comments

Why can’t we agree about internal isolation?

The debate about whether schools should be allowed to internally exclude children from lessons is a hot topic at the moment, with all sorts of people weighing in at both ends of the spectrum of opinion. Whether you agree or disagree with the concept of internal exclusion probably says something about whether you prioritise the rights of the group or the rights of the individual. But it's also probably true [...]

By |January 19th, 2020|Categories: behaviour|4 Comments

Read the latest Learning Spy newsletter here.

If you like what you see, subscribe here:

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

#Cleverer

#PsychBook

#WrongBook

The Secret of Literacy

The Perfect English Lesson

Recent Posts

Tag thingy

Subscribe

Enter your email to subscribe to The Learning Spy. You will receive notifications of new posts by magic.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Join Over 10,000 Subscribers Learning from David Didau

Become Part of David Didau’s Network and Further Your Teaching Career.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.